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For many, university education abroad will continue to be a popular way to emigrate.

For many, university education abroad will continue to be a popular way to emigrate.

Political and business decisions are often the answer to consumer demand. New technologies are rapidly changing the quality of life of millions of people, especially in rural and remote areas. The use of new tools and devices is changing outdated social norms and attitudes. Temporal and spatial dimensions, as transformative effects of globalization, are gradually unfolding before our eyes. The effects of globalization on education are still being realized, not yet completed, in part because higher education is interconnected and dependent on the political will of governments. Government spending on higher education (compared to total education spending) is declining. For example, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the share of countries spending on higher education in 2000 averaged 75%, and in 2011 69% of total education spending. their own education is growing rapidly as a result of the possible personal gain of a diploma and a degree. Government spending on research and development of new technologies is shifting towards the application of applied rather than purely scientific research. In turn, “big science” projects are increasingly funded by industry and pursue strategic business goals. More and more countries are developing bilateral and multilateral trade and partnership agreements (such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership), and moving away from conceptual organizations such as the WTO and the United Nations. In some cases, the authority of governments in identifying and addressing major social issues and challenges is undermined by declining confidence in public institutions (including higher education institutions). In contrast, multinational companies play a more prominent role in the decision-making processes of national governments. Over the next few decades, a number of determinants will emerge that will have an impact on international education. The proportion of people with higher education will increase, especially in developing countries and countries with economies in transition. By 2040, in most such countries, this share will exceed 60%. This means that previously unmet demand for national higher education in countries such as China, India, Brazil and Indonesia will be met. Demand for study abroad is likely to increase, albeit at a slower pace than the boom. in the late 1990s and mid-2000s. Short-term exchange programs (such as the European Commission’s Erasmus program) are likely to be supported by governments, sponsors and businesses, and students are fully aware of the benefits of such programs. these will be bilateral student exchange programs (for example, American students of Mexican descent study in Mexico and vice versa; mutual relocation of German and Polish students). In particular, these programs will be developed due to the growing role of diasporas in opening new sources of economic and cognitive activity. Many countries that seek to become educational centers for international students will either succeed or completely exhaust themselves. Leading countries in international education are likely, will remain competitive. These dominant countries may face increased competition from, for example, China, Malaysia or Singapore. Education systems are globally interconnected, as are many other service industries. What happens in one area finds a response in another. By 2040, higher education will be more closely linked to related industries (eg, media, telecommunications and professional services). It is assumed that education will be controlled by fewer players than now, and this will affect the final choice of students in matters of international mobility. Increasingly, scientific initiatives (including “big science” projects) will be determined by international intersectoral cooperation. It is assumed that this likely concentration of research will affect the final choice of specialization of prospective students and the research potential of many educational institutions. Strategic partnerships of educational institutions and systems will grow in size and become more complex INSEAD business schools with the universities of Wharton, Tsinghua, Columbia University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Massive open online courses (MOOCs) will affect all sectors of education, with the emergence of multi-sectoral partnerships. In the long run, MEPs will improve the quality of their services and will be seen as an additional source of education. Educational and qualification standards will become typical and likely to be averaged for trading partner countries. This trend is likely to increase international student mobility. At the same time, the cost of training programs, the reputation and image of the educational institution will also influence the final choice of students. The provision of private education and personal participation in education will spread around the world. The difference between public and private education providers will be less noticeable due to reduced government spending and increased private contributions. The gap between large, elite, commercial, quasi-state universities and the rest will widen. This can lead to the merger of educational institutions and affect the narration ideas choice of place of study by international students. Death or boom? Many argue that higher education is in a state of constant change. The number of students entering higher education institutions, including those studying abroad, will continue to grow in the coming years, unless major conflicts or financial crises occur, which may impede people’s mobility. Depending on global development dynamics, the projected number of foreign students receiving higher education in 2040 may range from 9.1 million people (low growth) to 12.3 million people (medium growth) and up to 15.7 million people (high growth). For many, university education abroad will continue to be a popular way to emigrate. Such countries can reap significant benefits from the use of skilled immigrants, especially because there is no need to invest in primary and secondary education for this category of people. Student mobilityAnalysis of international trade data and global flows of foreign students for several years suggests a geographical shift According to UNESCO, in 2000, 25% of foreign university students from around the world came from East Asia and the Pacific. Their share increased to 33% by 2012. In 2040, the share of international students from these regions may range from 43% to 47% of the total number of international students. By 2040, developing countries, whose economic growth will peak in the second half of the 21st century, will set new standards and change the world order. … Be it the countries of South and West Asia, Central Asia or Central Europe, they will establish a new order of international education within the next fifty years. Such countries include Egypt, Iran, Poland, Romania, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Nigeria, Cuba, Colombia and Chile. In China and India, there is currently an unmet demand for higher education of about 30 million young people for each of these countries. … This number is enough to keep the international education industry afloat for several years. Once this demand is met, around 2025, international student mobility will change (provided that all other elements of this complex equation remain unchanged). For the leading countries in the industry, replacing the markets of China, Brazil or any other densely populated country sending students to study abroad will be a challenge. More than two generations of students from East Asia and the Pacific are studying abroad. It can be assumed that there are some ingrained expectations of students from Asian countries from foreign higher education; for other students, offers of higher education in the domestic market are sufficient, for example, for most students from Australia, the United States or the United Kingdom. They have enough short trips abroad. The number of foreign students from South and West Asia is constantly growing – 7% in 2000 and 10% in 2012. Their number will grow to 14% or 15% by 2040. The number of students from Central and Eastern Europe will also grow. The major changes taking place at the global level will have a significant impact on the planning, funding, delivery and quality assurance of higher education around the world. It is very important that higher education professionals keep pace with future changes and actively regulate international education strategies in the light of changing circumstances. By 2040, markets such as China, India or Brazil will be replaced by more than one market. most likely, several. Thus, in the long run, institutional strategies for engaging students should take into account past and current trends, as well as include plans to deal with unexpected events or circumstances. As, for example, with the Asian financial crisis of 1997, which negatively affected the educational institutions of countries hosting foreign students from Asia. For educational organizations and governments, effective and well-established strategic partnerships, cooperation agreements in various fields, relevant national priorities are important. and agreed policy goals. The transnational mobility of students, faculty, skills and ideas will depend on how educational institutions, governments and other stakeholders define and develop such partnerships and agreements.